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No Shirt, No Shoes, No Supply

Teachers are role models for students and they should be required to abide by a standard of professional dress at all times," This was much simpler in the older days, a black cap and a cloak was all you were required and nobody cared what was underneath it. Whether you are a student teacher, supply teacher or hired for your first teaching job you will need to dress the part. What you wear makes a difference to your students, colleagues and how you perform in your job, to be the part you have to look the part.
Teaching in a classroom, no matter how casual your teaching approach, is a business. Your attire should be business casual and follow any dress codes the school enforces. No matter what, a teacher should always dress better than his/her students and be comfortable in the clothes they are wearing.


1. Never wear jeans or trainers or t-shirts, unless you are teaching PE, then trainers and tracksuits are required during that lesson
2. Never show your undergarments and avoid cleavage or see through garments
3. Don't wear clothes with holes. (The current fashion accepts destroyed, damaged and worn jeans. You are not a student. Wear these items during non-working hours.)
4. Watch the length on your skirts (The recommendation is to have your skirts be just above the knee or longer to give a more professional appeal.)
5. Iron your clothes. (In college you may have rolled out of bed and grabbed the shirt off the floor. This is not acceptable in the workplace.)
6. Pay attention to your shoes. (You will be standing, so make sure they are comfortable. Avoid shoes that will attract students' attention like super high spiked heels.)
7. Make sure your clothes fit properly. (Too tight or too loose can be the target for student comments.)


If you have any question regarding whether an outfit is acceptable or not, remember that you will be standing in front of numerous students. They will be listening to you, but many will be scrutinizing every detail of your outfit and pointing it out to another who points it out to another, ask yourself if the outfit under question demands respect.


Teaching can be difficult enough without worrying about what you should wear in front of the classroom. While most teachers never have a problem with their wardrobes, there are teachers in every corner of the world that need a fashion awakening. Good luck!


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Tags: Protocol Education, Teach in the UK, Supply Teaching, Teach in England, Teach in London, Facebook, Twitter, Jobs in Uk, Jobs in England, Dress Codes for UK Schools, What Teachers Wear

Category: Teach in the UK


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