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Teacher Number Comparisons - NSW v UK

Mitch Jones is Protocol Education's NSW-based recruitment consultant helping Aussie teachers find casual and full time teaching jobs in London and across England. In his latest blog, he highlights the comparisons of teacher statistics between the UK and his home state.

 

If you’ve been following our social media updates and reading the attached news articles (such as this one and this one too) you should know that there is currently an acute teacher shortage in the UK. They are projected to be nearly 30,000 teachers under their requirements by 2017; that's only 2 years away!

I thought it would be good to showcase some cold hard figures to highlight some facts:

 

As of March 2014:

  • There are 44,000 teachers in NSW alone still looking for permanent work
  • Only 1.6% of positions in NSW schools go to teachers under 24 (new grads)
  • Only 8% of all positions go to teachers aged between 25-29

(source: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/about-us/plans-reports-and-statistics/key-statistics-and-report/Age-profiles-fact-sheet-2015.pdf)

 

These obviously make for pretty tough reading, especially if you are a new grad and looking to secure a permanent teaching role!

 

To really highlight it I thought it would be good to show a comparison to UK figures to see if it was in fact a problem specific to NSW or if it is reflected in England as well. So...I did some digging and found some glaring comparisons for you. As of April 2014 (so around the same time):

 

  • If you're under 25 you're nearly FIVE TIMES more likely to land a full time position in England than in NSW (1.6% in NSW compared to 7.5% in England)
  • If you're aged between 25-29 you're still over TWICE as likely to land a full time role too (8% in NSW compared to 18% in England)

(source: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-workforce)

 

This shows that if you are aged between 20-30 then you stand a 25% chance of getting a permanent teaching job in the UK - that's 1 in 4 (just in case your maths is rusty!) In NSW that figure isn't even 1 in 10!! This clearly highlights the job opportunities for you in the UK.

We cannot keep up with the demand from schools and we're already receiving early correspondence from some of the more well regarded schools across the country for positions to start in January in addition to trying to staff current full time vacancies still available for September.

 

If you are a new graduate or experienced teacher looking to develop yourself in a full time or permanent teaching position in the UK then we need to hear from you. Please call 1800 246 436 or email us at australia@protocol-education.com for more information or to be shortlisted for full time roles commencing in January 2016.


Tags: Australian Teachers, UK teaching jobs, Full time jobs in the UK, Protocol Education

Category: Australian Teachers


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