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Why Technology Is Your Friend, Not Your Foe

Ivan is a Canadian trained Secondary teacher who is currently in a permanent postion through Protocol Education in a school in Milton Keynes.

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Why Technology Is Your Friend, Not Your Foe

The battle between teacher and mobile phone is endless. Students nowadays can’t seem to live without them. So why fight it? Use them to your advantage to make a lesson interactive, engaging and up-to-date.

•    Teaching Shakespeare? Have students rewrite confusing scenes via text message, to make it more approachable and fun.
•    Send a tweet with a question you want the students to answer, or a reminder for the next day!
•    No calculator in Maths? That’s what calculator apps are for!
•    To make sure students are on track, have them set timers on their phones to complete a timed task!
•    Unsure if everyone understands, or want to know student knowledge before you begin? Poll the class to see instant results! http://www.polleverywhere.com/


There are many other ways to allow technology to help (rather than hurt!) your teaching:


•    eReaders are beneficial for silent reading time. Not only do they look cool, they house many books that students can choose at the touch of a button!
•    Laptops make writing easier for some students, so as long as you keep an eye out, why not allow them to type? Not to mention, if there is WiFi at the school, they can look up answers to questions that they may have or find electronic versions of texts to save a tree!
•    Websites  that are beneficial to both students and teachers, such as www.voki.com, where students can post discussion question, reflect, and blog; Teachers may personalize an on-line presence, create an overview of the day or week, give out assignment and reminders, and lighten up serious topics.
•    Interactive whiteboards allow for interactive games, and videos, and allow you to go green. They get students up and moving by having them write directly on the screen or compete in an educational game with the rest of the class. The internet is also only a touch away for easy access to resources and fun activities online.
 

Long story short, it is important to embrace the changing times. Don’t be intimidated by all of the new technology, or get frustrated with the mobile collection on your desk. Explain to your students that technology will be celebrated as long as students respect the educational purpose they serve.

Related Blogs:

3 Ways to Play for Time

UK Lesson Plans: Work with What You are Given

The Art of the Telephone Interview


Tags: Ivan, Secondary, Teach in UK, Technology, Mobile Phones, Protocol Education

Category: Australian Teachers


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