Get in touch

Job Search

Search for Teaching Jobs in England

How Much Money To Save For Your UK Trip

Mitch Jones is one of our Australian-based recruitment consultants. In this latest blog he highlights how much money you'll actually need to take with you to the UK when you start your teaching trip.

 

So you’ve made the choice to do some teaching in England – well done! But the figure at the bottom of your bank statement doesn’t fill you with confidence (especially when you hear all the things about the cost of living in London!) So how much money do you actually need to safely make it to the UK and get settled in?

It’s not as much as you think!

As a rule of thumb we recommend the minimum figure to travel to teach in England is $5000 that’s Aussie dollars, not British pounds. $5000 gives you a good buffer zone of about 4-6 weeks before you need to start work and worry about getting some money coming in. To be honest nearly all Aussie & Kiwi teachers start working within 2 weeks anyway, so unless you’re partying like Charlie Sheen you won’t hit the end of your $5k before then.

Let’s break it down over a 4 week period:

 

RENT & BOND

• The two most expensive things you’ll have to lay out when you arrive; generally one month’s rent and another month for your bond
• If you’re living in a flat in London (let’s say £700 per month for your room) that’s about £1400 straight away – but let’s round it up to £1500 just to be sure
• Chuck on another $500 for short term accommodation (Air BnB, hostels or hotels) for when you first arrive

TOTAL:  approx $3500

 

FOOD & DRINK

• Contrary to popular belief, groceries and the general cost of living in London is actually cheaper than Australia!
• We’d budget around £20 a day for food and drink; this covers groceries , some eating out & going for a drink every other night when you first arrive so we’re not scrounging here! No 2 minute noodles and baked beans for dinner!!

TOTAL:  approx $1000
.
 

OTHER

• Essentials like stuff for your new flat (linen, kitchen supplies etc) (about $200)
• Play tourist – visiting all the cheesy landmarks when you first arrive! (say $100)
• Transport – loading up your Oyster card or buying train & bus tickets ($150 will cover you for a few weeks)
• Loading up your SIM card (which we give you before you go) with some credit ($50 will last a while!)

TOTAL: approx $500

GRAND TOTAL FOR 4 WEEKS: $5000

 

There you go! $5000 will last you a minimum of 4 weeks without scrimping on budgets. Anything more than $5000 just gives you a longer buffer and a bigger safety net, however for those teachers struggling to save then you can feel confident travelling to England with only $5000 in your bank account.

 

Do you have any more questions for our Aussie-based consultants? Get in touch directly or submit a quick online inquiry!


 


Tags: Mitch, Aussie Teachers in England, Money

Category: Australian Teachers


Share |


Back to the Blog Home Page

Comments (0)

There are no comments to show. You can add one by using the form below.

Add a Comment

Name:
Email (kept private):
Comment:
Security Code: antispam
Protocol Education Blog

OCTOBER 2017 | "Your teaching agency needs to be transparent"
Jacqui is an Aussie teacher who has just returned from her 2 years in the UK. She got in touch with Mitch from the Sydney office and has been able to...
Read More

AUGUST 2017 | Aussie Dollar vs British Pound
Mitch Jones is Protocol Education’s NSW-based consultant working with Australian teachers in their move to the UK. In his latest blog he chats...
Read More

JUNE 2017 | Taking a long term approach to teaching
Alyce is an Aussie Primary teacher who took part in our September 2016 round of 'Interviews with a UK Principal.' Rather than start her role...
Read More

MAY 2017 | Been to London, Bought the T-Shirt, Back in Sydney
Brad is an Aussie teacher who has just returned to Sydney after spending nearly 2 years living and teaching with Protocol in London! Fair to say he’s...
Read More

A Teacher's Journey to London
Stephanie is a teacher originally from Canada, and in this latest blog she wants to give some advice (and hopefully inspiration) to other teachers from...
Read More